Cap Corse

Often called an island within an island, the Cap Corse is a maquis covered peninsula whose history sets it apart from the rest of the island.

Forty kilometres long and only fifteen across, the rocky peninsula of Cap Corse gives access to some exceptionally beautiful and unspoilt stretches of coast.

Villages perched on cliffs and secluded rocky inlets line the west; tiny fishing ports and sandy coves fringe the east. Enjoy some coastal walks along the rugged northern coast of the Cap Corse. Inland, and to the north, the village of Luri, surrounded by lemon trees and vineyards, hosts an annual wine fair at the beginning of July with winemakers from throughout Corsica proudly presenting their wares.

A complete circuit of the Cap Corse will take you about four hours from St Florent (without stops) and we recommend that you always drive in a clockwise direction so that you are always in the inside lane (the road can be narrow and winding and the drops are precipitous).

Nonza

Worth visiting is Nonza, a flower-garnished slate roofed village, which seems to have sprouted from its craggy foundations. Centuri Port makes a great lunch spot as its many restaurants are based around the old fishing port and their menus are reliant on the catch of the day.

 
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Things to See & Do

  • Often called an island within an island, the Cap Corse is a maquis covered peninsula whose history sets it apart from the rest of the island. Tiny ports divide the east side as the western villages are sited on rugged cliffs. On the west of Cap Corse, narrow roads wind above a dramatically serrated coastline, dotted with little coves, whilst the sea washes on the rocks below and woods and maquis outline the peaks above. Take a day driving around the Cap Corse and discover landscapes of the astounding beauty.
  • Stop for lunch at Centuri Port and watch the fishermen offload their catch.  
  • At the northerly point of Cap Corse at Rogliano stands the Moulin Mattei restored by the Mattei family (of apéritif fame) in the 20th Century, a short walk will afford you magnificent if not windy views out over either side of the Cap and if you are lucky you will see the Tuscan islands and the coast of Italy beyond.
  • From Macinaggio one can walk the sentiers des douaniers (customs officers route) to Barcaggio, many follow just a small part of the route for a day's walking - the famous Genoese towers along the way are an impressive sight against the coastal backdrop. The path goes through the Capandula nature reserve which also boasts excellent, uncrowded beaches.
  • Worth visiting is Nonza, a flower-garnished slate roofed village, which seems to have sprouted from its craggy foundations. The beach here is black.
  • The fishing port of Erbalunga on the eastern coast clings to a little jagged promontory, opal waves slapping against gaudy fishing boats. The pedestrianised village has many cafés and restaurants and a Genoese tower on the headland and is the home of a Jazz festival in August.